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Fictionalism - Modal Fictionalism - From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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FictionalismFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigationJump to search
Fictionalism is the view in philosophy according to which statements that appear to be descriptions of the world should not be construed as such, but should instead be understood as cases of "make believe", of pretending to treat something as literally true (a "useful fiction"). Two important strands of fictionalism are modal fictionalism developed by Gideon Rosen, which states that possible worlds, regardless of whether they exist or not, may be a part of a useful discourse, and mathematical fictionalism advocated by Hartry Field, which states that talk of numbers and other mathematical objects is nothing more than a convenience for doing science. Also in meta-ethics, there is an equivalent position called moral fictionalism (championed by Richard Joyce). Many modern versions of fictionalism are influenced by the work of Kendall Walton in aesthetics. Fictionalism consists in at least t…

Impossible World - From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Impossible worldFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigationJump to search
In philosophical logic, the concept of an impossible world (sometimes non-normal world) is used to model certain phenomena that cannot be adequately handled using ordinary possible worlds. An impossible world, w, is the same sort of thing as a possible world (whatever that may be), except that it is in some sense "impossible." Depending on the context, this may mean that some contradictions are true at w, that the normal laws of logic or of metaphysics fail to hold at w, or both.
Contents 1Applications1.1Non-normal modal logics1.2Avoiding Curry's Paradox1.3Counternecessary statements2Resources3External links Applications[edit]Non-normal modal logics[

Possible World - From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Possible worldFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigationJump to search
"Possible worlds" redirects here. For other uses, see Possible Worlds. In philosophy and logic, the concept of a possible world is used to express modal claims. The concept of possible worlds is common in contemporary philosophical discourse but has been disputed.
Contents 1Possibility, necessity, and contingency2Formal semantics of modal logics3From modal logic to philosophical tool4Possible-world theory in literary studies5See also6References7Further reading8External links Possibility, necessity, and contingency[edit]Further information: