Posts

Showing posts from May, 2019

Theory of justification (epistemology) -- "Abductive reasoning, A priori knowledge, Argument, Autonomy and freedom of choice, Axiom or Postulate, Coherence, Command and control, subordination in a hierarchy, Common sense, Conformity, Conscience, Consequence (effect), Cost–benefit analysis, Deduction, Dialectic, Socratic method, Marxist dialectic, Hegelian dialectic, Dogma, Duty and Deontological ethics, Empiricism, Enlightenment (spiritual), Evidence, Fatalism, Group decision-making, Groupthink, Hedonism, Induction, Intuition, Law, Law of nature, Logical positivism, Mathematical proof Occam's Razor, Pragmatism, Probability theory, Rationalism, Reason, Revelation, Divination, Divine illumination, Scientific demonstration, Scientific method, Self-interest, Taboo, Tradition, Utility, Will to power" - From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Image
Theory of justificationFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The theory of justification is a part of epistemology that attempts to understand the justification of propositions and beliefs. Epistemologists are concerned with various epistemic features of belief, which include the ideas of justification, warrant, rationality, and probability. Loosely speaking, justification is the reason that someone (properly) holds a belief. When a claim is in doubt, justification can be used to support the claim and reduce or remove the doubt. Justification can use empiricism (the evidence of the senses), authoritative testimony (the appeal to criteria and authority), or reason.
Subjects[edit]Justification focuses on beliefs. This is in part because of the influence of the definition of knowledge as "justified true belief" often associated with a theory discussed near the end of the Plato's dialogues Meno and Theaetetus. More generally, theories of justification focus on the justification…

Theory of justification (epistemology) -- "Abductive reasoning, A priori knowledge, Argument, Autonomy and freedom of choice, Axiom or Postulate, Coherence, Command and control, subordination in a hierarchy, Common sense, Conformity, Conscience, Consequence (effect), Cost–benefit analysis, Deduction, Dialectic, Socratic method, Marxist dialectic, Hegelian dialectic, Dogma, Duty and Deontological ethics, Empiricism, Enlightenment (spiritual), Evidence, Fatalism, Group decision-making, Groupthink, Hedonism, Induction, Intuition, Law, Law of nature, Logical positivism, Mathematical proof Occam's Razor, Pragmatism, Probability theory, Rationalism, Reason, Revelation, Divination, Divine illumination, Scientific demonstration, Scientific method, Self-interest, Taboo, Tradition, Utility, Will to power" - From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Image
Theory of justification From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The theory of justification is a part of epistemology that attempts to understand the justification of propositions and beliefs. Epistemologists are concerned with various epistemic features of belief, which include the ideas of justification, warrant, rationality, and probability. Loosely speaking, justification is the reason that someone (properly) holds a belief. When a claim is in doubt, justification can be used to support the claim and reduce or remove the doubt. Justification can use empiricism (the evidence of the senses), authoritative testimony (the appeal to criteria and authority), or reason.
Subjects[edit] Justification focuses on beliefs. This is in part because of the influence of the definition of knowledge as "justified true belief" often associated with a theory discussed near the end of the Plato's dialogues Meno and Theaetetus. More generally, theories of justification focus on the justific…

Epistemology (theory of knowledge) - From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Image
EpistemologyFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

"Theory of Knowledge" redirects here. For the book by Roderick Chisholm, see Theory of Knowledge (book). It has been suggested that Epistemics be merged into this article. (Discuss) Proposed since December 2018. Part of a series onPhilosophyPlatoKantNietzsche BuddhaConfuciusAverroes PhilosophersAestheticiansEpistemologistsEthicistsLogiciansMetaphysiciansSocial and political philosophersTraditionsAfricanAnalyticAristotelianBuddhistChineseChristianContinental